writing

In 2016 Farrar, Straus and Giroux published Jace Clayton’s book, Uproot: Travels in 21st Century Music and Digital Culture. His essays have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Bidoun, and n+1, and he contributes regularly to Frieze and The Fader.

 

SELECTED ESSAYS
On rap and white noise, for The New York Times Magazine, March 2016.

Review: Clement Siatous’ Sagren at Simon Preston GalleryFrieze, 2015.

Something NewThe Fader, 2012.  On incredible new music called festival coming out of Cairo, in the context of post-revolutionary Egypt.

La Voz de HuitzilpochtliFrieze, 2012.  Examining how Aztec-inspired sounds and ideas of cyclical time interact with online remix culture & Mexican electronic music.

Happy Songs –  The Fader, 2012. A group of Californian musicians tap into the heart of The Congo’s Jamaica.

Curiosity SlowdownFrieze,  2010. This essay on the slowed-down tempos of screw and its influence on contemporary bands was selected by Alex Ross for inclusion in the Best Music Writing 2011 book.

Tribal Guarachero: Mexican Teens & Aztec HistoryThe Fader, 2009. Clayton investigates the incredible new music phenomenon of tribal guarachero.

Interview: Abraham CruzvillegasFrieze, 2015. On the occasion of the Mexican artist’s Tate Turbine Hall installation.

Interview: DJ KhaledThe Fader, summer 2013.

Interview: Philip GlassThe Fader, fall 2012.

Confessions of a DJ n+1, 2009.  This essay was selected by Greil Marcus for inclusion in the Best Music Writing 2009 book.

Pitch PerfectFrieze, 2009. The best article on Auto-Tune or your money back. New York Times called this ‘Idea of the Day’. Zeitgeisty!

Through the WiresThe National. December 2009. “Born and raised in internet chatrooms and DIY studios, world music 2.0 has colonised international playlists…”

Christine Abdelnour Sehnaoui: Respiratory DisorderThe National, October 2010. Profile of musician Christine Abdelnour Sehnaoui and the experimental music scene in Beirut.

Past MastersThe National, October 2009. “Since the 1960s, Western musicians have been making pilgrimages to Jajouka, a tiny Moroccan village of 600. Jace Clayton considers a musical identity crisis created by overseas demand for ancient authenticity.”

Slow BurnThe Fader, spring 2008. Buenos Aires to the Bay Area, 2008 is experiencing the explosion of cumbia, a bomb with a century-long fuse.

Rock the Rai NowThe National, November 2008.

Muslin GazeBidoun, 2007. Reflections on British musician Bryn Jones aka Muslimgauze.

Defending the Pig: Oink CroaksMudd Up!, October 2007. Later translated into Spanish and Italian and reprinted in Abitare.

Search and RescueFrieze, September 2008. The hunt for rare African funk records raises questions about how the digitized music of the 21st century will be archived.

EpiphaniesWire, early 2000s. “Jace Clayton, aka DJ /rupture, remembers how a cassette of Japanese noise became the first music he could call his own.”